Waiting Room

Thanks to Marie Gail Stratford for the unusual photo for the prompt this week and to Rochelle for her unswerving dedication to Friday Fictioneers.


Copyright Marie-Gail Stafford

Copyright Marie Gail Stratford

Genre: Fiction

Word Count: 100

Waiting Room

Children play quietly with toys in the corner, they look up as a parent or grandparent walks from a consulting room to the x-ray department. I watch them as I wait for you to come back to me.

Not able to sit still, I join a line of worried relatives at the coffee bar. We buy coffee, tea, cake – anything to fill our minds, to give us a moment free from doubt and fear. No-one mentions the word we all dread, but ‘what if’ is whispered and hands are clasped tight.

Then suddenly, you’re walking towards me.

And you’re smiling.

A Bridge Trip

Thanks as always to Rochelle for her sterling work and thanks to The Reclining Gentleman for the photo this week.

Copyright The Reclining Gentlemen

                                             Copyright The Reclining Gentlemen

Genre: Fiction

Word Count: 100

A Bridge Trip

Jerry limped into the bar on North Street and hauled himself onto a stool.

‘You got money this time Jerry?’

‘Not  ‘xactly.’

‘You know the rules, NO credit.’

Lowering his voice Jerry leant in, ‘Ben, listen, there’s a hole in the pavement on Murray Bridge. No sign. Nothing. I sorta tripped and hurt myself. A guy helped me and said I’ll get comperation, that’s cash aint it?’’

He wiped a grubby hand across his mouth, watching Ben pour a beer for a paying customer.

Ben laughed, then pushed a beer towards him, ‘Jerry, you’re unbelievable. Get a job, it’s safer.’




Prussia Cove

Thank you to Rochelle, the hard-working captain of the good ship Friday Fictioneers and thanks also to Jen Pendergast for the lovely photo this week, I’ve kept the connection with boats…

copyright Jen Pendergast

                                             copyright Jen Pendergast

Genre: Historical Fiction

Word Count: 100

Prussia Cove

‘Come away from the window Alice.’

‘Mother, I heard their horses.’

‘You know it’s not safe, come away.’

Alice climbed back into her bed. She drifted back to sleep cuddling Charlotte, her new rag doll.  As she slept, her mother lit the torches in the network of tunnels below their house, before running out to help her husband and the other men from the village. Rolls of silk, packets of tobacco, barrels of brandy were swiftly hidden from sight.

‘The King of Prussia’s’ men had relieved another wreck of its cargo, before the customs men came galloping along the beach.


The  house above Prussia Cove

Copyright Halsgrove Publishing

Copyright Halsgrove Publishing

For more information on the self-styled King of Prussia and his family 

… and an extract from  ‘A Smuggler’s Song’ by Rudyard Kipling

‘IF you wake at midnight, and hear a horse’s feet,

Don’t go drawing back the blind, or looking in the street,

Them that ask no questions isn’t told a lie.

Watch the wall my darling while the Gentlemen go by.’









Past Imperfect

It’s a lovely morning here, the sun is streaming in though the windows as I write, it looks more like spring than autumn. In any event, it’s a lovely day to wish a very Happy Birthday to Rochelle and to my sister, who also celebrates today.

I watched a building, much older than the one pictured, being pulled down a few days ago, and wondered…

4 September

Genre: Fiction

Word Count: 100

Past Forgiving

From a safe distance, I watch the demolition team start work. A small group of people gather at the safety barrier; I recognise a few of them, but doubt many would recognise me, now.

The place that was once my home but became my prison, is reduced to piles of rubble. A workman in the basement shouts something to his supervisor who runs across the street.  

Mrs Goodman leaves the group of onlookers; she glances in my direction, a half smile forming on her thin lips as she walks away. We both know what’s been found; no point hanging around.


click here to read what other FF’s have written

Madam, do you trust him?

Good to be back. The photo this week is from Claire Fuller, I have just finished reading her brilliant book ‘Our Endless Numbered Days’ which certainly stays with you quite a while after you finish reading.Thank you to Rochelle for her continued captaincy of the good ship ‘FF’ and for her latest book ‘Please Say Kaddish For Me’ which I have just started to read.  I feel humble to be in such talented company.

Copyright - Claire Fuller

Copyright – Claire Fuller

Genre: Historical Fiction

Word Count: 100

‘Madam, do you trust him?’

‘I have a mind to.  Anthony has been a loyal page and is also a good friend of John Ballard, both seem set upon my release. The letter sets out a plan so daring, it takes my breath away, but with God’s help it will succeed. Bring me paper, I will reply.’

Imprisoned at Chartley, Mary’s letters were encrypted by her secretary Gilbert Curle and smuggled out in casks of ale, only to be intercepted by Sir Francis Walsingham. Her eager reply to Babington’s letter sealed the fate of both herself and the plotters.

The Babington Plot

Courtesy of National Archives

Courtesy of National Archives


Courtesy of Wikipedia

Mary,Queen of  Scots                                         Courtesy of Wikipedia



Cee’s Oddball Photo Challenge Week 34

Cee’s Oddball Photo Challenge has given me the opportunity to share some photos that otherwise would never have been seen! Here are a couple that are hard to categorise, taken just outside the walls of the beautiful medieval city of Lucca

Statue in Lucca 1

Statue in Lucca 2

Posted for Cee’s Oddball Photo Challenge Week 34



Cee’s Oddball Photo Challenge Week 32 – Up The Creek

Up the Creek


This is a guide to the Creek Street area of Ketchikan in Alaska.  Fascinating place with some interesting history. Married Man’s Trail led over the river and through the woods… but definitely not to grandma’s house!!

Posted for Cee’s Oddball Photo Challenge



A Little Superstition Goes a Long Way

I joined Friday Fictioneers late in 2012 so missed this photo the first time round.  Sorry to hear Rochelle isn’t well, here’s to a speedy recovery.  Thanks for all her hard work and support since taking over  the FF mantle from Madison Woods

Copyright Madison

                                        Copyright Madison Woods

Genre: Historical Fiction

Word Count: 100

A Little Superstition Goes A Long Way

‘What do we do ma?’’  John’s voice trembled.

Recognising her son’s fear, Alice Grey reached for his hand.

‘Same as always John, we stick together. Speak to nobody.’

They walked along the hedgerows, keeping out of sight in case they were followed. The jailer had taken John’s boots and the rough track made his feet bleed. Alice picked leaves, wrapped them in a strip torn from her skirt and bound his feet.

‘How’d you know what to pick ma?’

‘Mother Demdike showed me.  She knew all the remedies.’

‘Was she hanged today?’

No, she died before being sentenced.’

‘Lucky beggar.’


 check out all the other stories here.

By way of explanation – Alice Grey was the only women found not guilty of witchcraft at the trial at Lancaster Prison in 1612.  All the other women from the Pendle area of Lancashire, who were tried, were hanged.

One Yorkshire woman accused of witchcraft was tried, found guilty and hanged at York.



Still trying to get my act together, but managed to get something in almost on time. Delighted to see Rochelle has used my photo of a sudden snowfall in Central Park – we were taking a carriage ride and suddenly the snow started falling – magical.

24 July


Genre: Fiction

Word Count: 100


Penny is late. I fiddle with the strap of my overnight bag. I don’t like waiting. I’ve been here so long people are staring. We said 5pm outside the café; the park closes at 6pm she’d better hurry up.

Sarah was the same where time was concerned, always late.  It got on my nerves in the end, along with her flawless skin. No need to cover her acne with layers of Max Factor. And her hair, so shiny and wavy… not so wavy the last time I saw her.  Everyone gets their comeuppance in the end though, it’s only fair.