RIP Joe


27 July 2018

Copyright – Ted Strutz

RIP Joe

Word Count 100

Fiction

It was nearly midnight when his body was discovered.

No-one had seen him arrive. The CCTV was scanned for hours; first one camera then the next and so on.

Sally, at the diner, thought she had seen him somewhere, sometime, but couldn’t remember where or when.

His face, nicely arranged for the TV cameras, was beamed out to the whole country on the network news channels.

‘That’s Joe’, Abe said, passing the bottle to Luis, while watching the huge TV in the shop across from their squat under the bridge.

‘Who Joe?’ asked Luis raising the bottle.

‘Dunno’, replied Abe.

 

Haven’t been around for quite a while, missed my fellow FFers.

Thanks to Ted Strutz for the inspiration this week and thanks as always to Rochelle, a Fairy Blogmother who never tires…

Advertisements

All Time Favourites – The Final Weekly Photo Challenge


It is difficult to choose my all time favourites for the final weekly photo challenge but here are a few of the photos I treasure for various reasons; happy memories, lovely holidays, and just because…   I hope you enjoy them.

IMG_0011(1)

The view from Wiseman’s Bridge towards Saundersfoot, Pembrokeshire, West Wales

P1000595

The Azure Window on the island of Gozo, it fell into the sea following a storm last year. Feel privileged to have seen it.

P1000946

This is the ship ‘Vasa’ – it sank on it’s maiden voyage in 1628, in  the harbour in Stockholm, it was raised over 330 years later and is now in the Vasa Musuem in Stockholm.

IMG_2159

Peonies, my most favourite flower

IMG_0741

This pearl monument is sited at the entrance to the Dhow Harbour in Doha, Qatar.

Garden in the Bay

These are some of the super ‘trees’ that form part of the Gardens by the Bay in Singapore.

Cafe Stories – The Burglary and The Diet


The café is at the crossroads.  It is set back from the road, with a large parking area at one side and a smaller grassed area at the front.  There are tables and chairs on the grass, in case anyone is brave enough to sit outside. From my seat by the window, I can look down the High Street and today being Friday, it is quite a busy thoroughfare.  I am surprised that the elderly couple, who normally sit at the table across from mine, are not here. I wonder what the problem is and hope nothing has happened to either of them.

Halfway through my first cappuccino I look up and see them at the crossing, waiting patiently for the traffic lights to change. I relax and smile, happy that they seem alright with no outward sign that anything is amiss.

Seated at the small table at the back, next to the magazine rack, Barry the Builder is eating his full English. I only see him on Fridays, but I am reliably informed that he is here every day without fail.  He is working on the new housing estate where, according to him, the houses being built are expensive, but have a ‘great spec’.

Next to me, two ladies are discussing the diet that one of them has just started. It seems quite harsh – no carbohydrates, no fat, no sugar, lots of protein and three vitamin supplements every day.  The one on the diet has lost 1 stone so far and tells her much slimmer friend she is determined to continue until she gets to her desired weight. From where I am sitting, it seems she has a long way to go.  I look at the Danish pastry on my plate and wonder how many calories it contains, but eat it anyway.

The elderly couple are telling the waitress that their house was broken into last night and have spent quite a long time with the police team.  Recounting the story, the lady is visibly upset and Kath, the owner of the cafe, comes forward with a pot of tea and a comforting arm.  The man says that the police phoned him, just before they left the house, to let them know that two boys have been apprehended.

I feel for them.  We were burgled once, a long time ago and it took quite a while to stop thinking about strangers rifling through our possessions and being worried about leaving the house empty for any length of time. Kath thinks it’s disgusting and says that quite a lot of houses in the area have been broken into during the past few weeks.  Barry gets up to pay his bill and tells the couple that if he had his way, the boys would be flogged. They think it a bit extreme, but Barry is convinced that it would stop the boys doing it again.

The friend of the lady on the diet, orders another coffee, ‘could you do me a large latte?’ she asks in a sort of self-satisfied voice, Kath tells her she will bring it over. With friends like that, I doubt  the diet is going to last for long…

 

 

 

 

A Magical Tour


 

Genre: Fiction

Word Count: 100

A Magical Tour

The tour was sold out. Placing a brochure on every seat, Susan anticipated a very busy day.

A middle-aged couple queried everything about the legend and the castle. Later, visiting the cave below, while she warned everyone about the dangers of straying from the path, the man shouted from the far wall, ‘it says in your blurb that Merlin lived here, how could you know?’

‘Yes, how could you know?’ the woman sniggered.  Susan pointed to an opening behind them, ‘you could find out in there.’

Afterwards, everyone complimented her on a great experience.

No-one mentioned the two empty seats.

 

 click for more stories

 

Thanks to our FBM Rochelle for supplying the photo for the prompt this week and for being there week after week ….it means a lot.

For more about Cornwall, Merlin’s cave below Tintagel castle, you can check the English Heritage link

 

 

Past Forgetting


4 August 2017

Copyright Dale Rogerson

Genre: Memoir

Word Count: 100

PAST FORGETTING

It’s easy to forget.

My mother would say this in her ‘martyr’ voice, on her birthday, when there was nothing from my father.

The flowers he sent on the birthday after their divorce, were sent back to him chopped up in small pieces. He got the message

The years that followed were not easy. While my mother fumed, he apologised repeatedly to my sister and I.  Although sad, we were adult enough to accept parents are only human, and deserve happiness too.

At his funeral, I held her whilst she sobbed, ‘I’ve lost him now.’

It’s not easy to forget.

 

Thank as always to Rochelle our ‘Fairy Blogmother’ for still finding time to sprinkle her fairy dust and to all other F’Fers you are a great group of writers.

No Mention


Genre: Fiction

Word Count: 100

No Mention

The estate agent’s glossy brochure is very appealing. Family home, six bedrooms, five bathrooms, annexe suitable for student or older person, large gardens with summer house and various out-buildings.

No mention of the room at the top of the house.  The room with no windows. The room with thick carpets and sound proofed walls. The room with mirrors and wardrobes full of clothes – if those things could be called clothes. No mention of the camera or the screen with five padded chairs placed behind it.

I was fifteen when I was first taken there.

No mention of that either.

Good to be back, it’s been a while. Hope you’ve all been keeping well. Thanks to our Fairy Blogmother, our ever busy, very productive leader Rochelle.

 

 

Weathering Our Storm (2)


Thanks to Georgia Koch for the lovely photo for our prompt this week and to our intrepid Captain Rochelle for navigating our good ship Friday Fictioneers  through all kinds of seas.

(I love this photograph and am so grateful to Rochelle for using it as the re-run this week and I have posted my original story. At present my ship is a bit wobbly, due in part to OH not being well, but we will be back on course very soon).

24 January Georgia Koch

Copyright – Georgia Koch

Genre: Fiction

Word Count:100

Weathering Our Storm

Will you come with me, to Venice?’

An invitation to the place where we began would once have sent my heart soaring. Dare I allow it to do so again?

‘I’ll think about it, if that’s alright?’

Oh, the care we take with one another.   I couldn’t ride out the maelstrom of his affair.  I had to scream it out, to hit back verbally against the waves of pain and sadness that engulfed and threatened to overpower me.

But somehow the storm abated, he chose to stay. How ambitious we are, how determined to keep our precious ship afloat.

‘Yes.’

 

For more stories click here 

 

The Entertainment


I’m grateful for the re-run this week and my thanks to Rochelle and Sandra. Things have been quite difficult the last few weeks, hopefully returning to something resembling normality. Thanks again to Adam Ickes for the photo.

40again's Blog

Another photo prompt this week for the wonderful group of writers, who make up the Friday Fictioneers Family.  Mother Hen Rochelle Wisoff-Fields takes charge every week, posting the photo – this week courtesy of Adam Ickes – and urging us all to ‘write what we see’.  This is what I saw…

Copyright - Adam Ickes Copyright – Adam Ickes

Genre: Horror

Word Count: 100

The Entertainment

Silence as the numbers are called. Nervous boys go to their allotted place, although challenged, no-one refuses. My number is called last. For one brief moment, as I join the other ninety-nine, I consider the challenge. My mother is ill and Mary’s pregnant, but The Glory will change everything, forever.

Outside, we line up shoulder to shoulder. The General reads the rules of ‘The Entertainment’.

You will walk until only one remains; to him will be awarded The Glory – anything he wants for the rest of his…

View original post 124 more words

Danger From Above


This was my post the first time round.  Sadly, similar scenes are still being played out and the lives of many children are in danger every day.  Thanks to Sandra and Rochelle for the re-run.

8 July 2016

Genre: Fiction

Word Count: 100

Danger From Above

The whitewashed walls reflected the sun’s glare. Alice adjusted her sunglasses.

Small stones skittered and bounced down a wall then, with a wail, a boy landed at her feet. He was small, dirty and frightened. Alice saw blood running down his left leg. She took off her rucksack, pulled out a bottle of water and some tissue.  She bathed his leg while he stared defiantly up at her. A battered car screeched to a halt, Alice stared in disbelief as the driver pulled out a gun. She screamed as a shot rang out. Pocketing his gun the boy hobbled away.

Thanks to Jan Morrill for the photograph and to Madison Woods for “Friday Fictioneers”. http://www.madison-woods.com/Wordpress/index-of-stories/101212-2/

City Girl


I’m grateful for a re-run this week. After years of searching we finally have a holiday home in France – more about that later. It has take up a lot of our time and I have missed chances to post anything as the internet connection at present is so slow, so very happy to offer up this post from 2012.

Thanks as ever to Rochelle who is busy being an author and getting the third book in her series ready for publication

For more stories – 

 

40again's Blog

(thanks to Piya Singh for the photo)

The auction guide said 75,000; the place was almost a ruin it would take a lot of time and money to make it habitable.

Rose pouted, her Manolos were scratched, her hair a mess. Sam smiled, “could be beautiful” he said.

Rose glowered and thought of what she could buy with 75,000+

It would never be beautiful, she frowned, it was an old ugly mess. She was a city girl.

Sam took her arm and led her inside, showing her his plans for Rose Cottage.

Rose made the front cover of ‘Homes & Gardens.’

Smiling, looking beautiful.

Friday Fictioneers devised by Madison Woods http://madison-woods.com/blog/ 

View original post